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ASIL is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, educational membership organization founded in 1906 and chartered by Congress in 1950. ASIL holds Special Consultative Status to the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations and is a constituent society of the American Council of Learned Societies. The Society is headquartered at Tillar House in Washington, DC.
 
Lectures on international law issues by eminent scholars, practitioners and judges of national and international courts. The lecture series is brought to you by the Public International Law Discussion Group, part of the Law Faculty of the University of Oxford, and is supported by the British Branch of the International Law Association and Oxford University Press. Further details of this series can be found on the Public International Law -https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/research-subject-groups/grad ...
 
The Lauterpacht Centre for International Law is the scholarly home of International law at the University of Cambridge. The Centre, founded by Sir Elihu Lauterpacht QC in 1983, serves as a forum for the discussion and development of international law and is one of the specialist law centres of the Faculty of Law. The Centre holds weekly lectures on topical issues of international law by leading practitioners and academics. For more information see the LCIL website at http://www.lcil.cam.ac.uk/
 
The Cambridge International Law Journal 8th Annual Cambridge International Law Conference on the topic 'New Technologies: New Challenges for Democracy and International Law' was held at the Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge, on 20 and 21 March 2019. For more information about the conference, and the Journal, see http://cilj.co.uk/
 
The 'Think Global: Careers in International Law' Podcast series is brought to you by the Global Law Students Association. In this series we chat with international legal professionals to discuss their pathway to the legal profession, their current role and advice they have for law students interested in an international legal career.
 
Conversations for the multinational employer on issues impacting their global business. The purpose of Littler's podcasts is to provide helpful information for employers, addressing the latest developments in labor and employment relations. They are not a substitute for experienced legal counsel and do not provide legal advice or attempt to address the numerous factual issues that arise in any employment-related issue.
 
The podcast follows the course European Company, Financial Markets, and Insolvency Law (Summer Term 2013). It covers the fundamentals of European Company, Financial Markets, and Insolvency Law in an international and comparative perspective. The primary focus of the course is on the existing legal framework. However, policy issues will also figure prominently. The European legal framework will be compared frequently to other jurisdictions. Within Europe, the focus will be on the UK, France, ...
 
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In this episode of International Law Talk, Kiran Nasir Gore, Associate Editor of Kluwer Arbitration Blog, interviews Claudia Salomon, President of the ICC International Court of Arbitration. The podcast discussion centers on technology in arbitration and various disruptions and opportunities that are anticipated to shape the future of dispute resol…
 
In this episode, Catherine speaks with Judge Chile Eboe-Osuji—former President of the International Criminal Court—about why international criminal justice is relevant today, his position on supporting an international tribunal to prosecute the crime of aggression related to Russia’s war in Ukraine, the relationship between international criminal l…
 
In this episode, Jasper Hoffstedde and Dennis Veldhuizen shed light on the works council’s purpose and added value in the decision-making process. For U.S.-based listeners, Dennis’ quick side-by-side comparison of union vs works council rights may be of interest. Furthermore, all of the basics are explained: when and how to set up a works council, …
 
Jasper Hoffstedde and Fleur van Lieshout of Littler’s Amsterdam office discuss the termination clause in Dutch employment agreements. The termination clause seems an easy and straightforward clause; you simply invoke the clause and terminate employment, right? For the employee that is indeed in the case, but the employer has another hoop to jump th…
 
Saudi leader Mohammed bin Salman is being sued in federal court with regard to the brutal murder of Jamal Khashoggi. A key issue is whether MBS’s apparent power and key leadership role give him immunity. We explore this issue, along with related foreign relations law questions, with Chimene Keitner, Fromm professor of law at UC Hastings and former …
 
For this podcast, Lena Hornkohl welcomed Thomas Thiede (Spieker & Jaeger) in-person at the University of Graz in Austria to discuss private enforcement of competition law. They touch on multiple topics such as the Damages Directive, the interplay between public and private enforcement as well as the issue of high procedural costs because of experts…
 
In this episode Shayan Ahmed is joined by Ashwita Ambast, Legal Counsel at the Permanent Court of Arbitration, to discuss the organization’s role and significance in the administration of inter-state Commissions of Inquiry and Conciliations. Our Socials: Twitter: @JCLawPodcast Blog: https://juscogens.law.blog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JCL…
 
Jasper Hoffstedde and Eric van Dam of Littler’s Amsterdam office discuss non-compete clauses in Dutch employment agreements. A non-compete clause may be agreed upon in writing in indefinite-term employment agreements with a person of age (18+). For fixed-term employment agreements, additional conditions apply. Such conditions are strict, which more…
 
“Data is the new gold” they say, and research based on data (empirical research) has become a hot topic in recent years. In this episode Maxi Scherer, General Editor of the Journal of International Arbitration (JOIA) interviews Monique Sasson, one of JOIA Special Issue editors about a recently published empirical research in international commercia…
 
This episode is the second and final edition of a two-part collaboration with the Netherlands Network for Human Rights Research (NNHRR) at T.M.C. Asser Institute for International & European Law. In this episode, we speak to Prof. Mariana Gkliati about one of Europe's most important border enforcement actors, Frontex. Particularly, we look at ways …
 
In this episode Kal speaks with the co-editors of the recent AJIL Unbound symposium on Ukraine and International Law, who discuss the contributions to the symposium and make the case that despite the horrific violence in Ukraine international law has fared better, and appears more resilient, than many might think.…
 
Lecture summary: The Geneva Conventions were adopted more than 70 years ago. How has their interpretation evolved over time? This lecture will look at the application of the rules on treaty interpretation to ‘older’ treaties, such as the 1949 Geneva Conventions. It draws upon the experience the speaker has gained in updating the commentaries on the…
 
A lecture delivered by Professor René Provost, McGill University at the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law (LCIL) on 29 April 2022.Several hundred European ISIS fighters, reportedly including nine British men and fifteen British women, have been held without trial by Syrian Kurdish forces for several years. The UK, like many European governme…
 
On this episode, we speak with Robin Churchill about the new edition of his book, co authored with Vaughan Lowe and Amy Sander on the Law of The Sea (4th edition, 2022). We explore the vast developments of the law and the post UNCLOS-phase premised in the book. Works Cited: Link to the Robin's upcoming book: https://manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/…
 
This episode is the first edition of a two-part collaboration with the Netherlands Network for Human Rights Research (NNHRR) at T.M.C. Asser Institute for International & European Law. For this episode, we are joined by NNHRR member Professor Otto Spijkers for a discussion on the actual and potential influence of climate litigation on the way the “…
 
In this episode, Layal Alghoozi sits down with Joanna Wilson (@JoannaLDWilson) from the International Law, Conflict and Security Research Group at the University of Glasgow to discuss Joanna's research on lethal autonomous weapons, exploring legal and moral arguments in the debate on regulating autonomy in warfare. Our Socials: Twitter: @JCLawPodca…
 
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