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This is an excerpt from a longer YouTube interview conducted with Professor Timothy Darvill in August 2021. The argument over the A303 Stonehenge Tunnel doesn't go away and although it may seem that the general consensus is that it's a bad idea, that impression is incorrect. One authoritative archaeological voice is that of Tim Darvill's and here w…
 
Hope you'll find it in your hearts to excuse the clickbaity title - but then again it is a truly valid use of the word 'alien'. The rocks in question are certainly not where they belong and pose a genuine mystery as to why they are where they have been found - down near Avebury henge in Wiltshire, 280 miles from their origin. We hope you enjoy our …
 
This is the audio from a Prehistory Guys YouTube video released in March 2022. https://youtu.be/ubMqZv_eozY Back in February we received an email from whoever deals with Tim Darvill's press releases with an embargoed link to his new paper: 'Keeping Time at Stonehenge'. We felt honoured to be included in a trusted circle - and normally would have do…
 
Pack your raincoat, because this week we're heading to a very stormy Jurassic. As the only geological period with bona fide movie star status, the Jurassic is full of prehistoric celebrities, from the first birds and mammals to - of course - the dinosaurs. But what should you wear? And where should you visit? Fortunately, Dr Evelyn Kustatscher of t…
 
Love warm, sandy beaches? Tropical azure seas? Metre-long sea scorpions? Then the Silurian is the backpacking destination for you! Join host David Mountain as he scuba dives through the Silurian period, the hidden gem of the Palaeozoic. Lasting from 444 to 419 million years again, this stretch of time sees the emergence of jawed fish, terrestrial a…
 
Wide open skies, grand horizons and the promise of adventure: the Neogene has it all. Join host David Mountain as he explores the varied environments of this time period and the plants and animals that made them up. You might even come face-to-face with your own ancestors in the plains of East Africa!* Providing valuable travel tips are two Neogene…
 
Join host David Mountain as he ventures into the tropical world of the Palaeogene, 66-23 million years ago. If you’re looking for volatile climates, volcanic activity and some of the most remarkable mammals to have ever walked the Earth, then the Palaeogene could be the perfect getaway! Providing the travel advice are two Palaeogene experts: Dr Mon…
 
🟢 IF YOU'D LIKE TO CONTRIBUTE - SEE OUR CROWDFUNDING LINKS BELOW 🟢 Dr. Lee Clare is the research co-ordinator and archaeologist in charge of the excavations at Göbekli Tepe. He took on the position of research coordinator of the DFG long-term project at Göbekli Tepe in 2015, and in 2019 moved to the DAI’s Istanbul Department where he is now acting …
 
For this episode of The Backpacker’s Guide To Prehistory, host David Mountain is setting his time machine for the distant Ordovician period, 485-444 million years ago. Dive into oceans teeming with long-lost wildlife, from trilobites to orthocones to the nightmarish conodonts. Providing some much-needed travel tips are Dr Lucy McCobb, a palaeontolo…
 
For the first episode of The Backpacker's Guide To Prehistory season two, host David Mountain travels back to the Carboniferous period, 359-299 million years ago. In this weird world of giant horsetails and monster arthropods, what creatures should you look out for? What clothes should you pack? And is it really such a good idea to light a campfire…
 
The backpack is back! The 17th January 2022 sees the long-awaited/half-forgotten return of The Backpacker's Guide To Prehistory - the podcast that provides top travel tips for time travellers. Across six brand new episodes, host David Mountain will be asking experts in palaeobiology about the most important, interesting and exciting aspects of our …
 
We talk with archaeologist Sue Greaney, Senior Properties Historian with English Heritage and Editor of PAST, the newsletter of the Prehistoric Society about her passion for archaeology and her responsibilities at Stonehenge and other sites managed by English Heritage. The main reason we wanted to get her on, though is that Sue is the author of a f…
 
We're very proud to bring you our interview with Professor Alice Roberts - anatomist and biological anthropologist, author and broadcaster and Professor of Public Engagement in Science at the University of Birmingham. Alice will need no introduction for many of you, but to understand why we were so thrilled that she agreed to be on the show, as per…
 
Our second interview with Tim Darvill and a riveting first-person deep dive through prehistoric archaeology from in-the-moment practical concerns of current practice, through to the more philosophical concerns confronting the modern day antiquarian. We talk about Stonehenge, long barrows, bluestones, emerging narratives for the Neolithic, prehistor…
 
More for your money in this Prehistory Flash: we've expanded the format to include more than one item to help return us to more of the podcast style delivery. Hope you enjoy!There will be video versions to follow. This time: Pythagorian geometry in Mesopotamia 1,000 before Pythagoras New finds at King Arthur's Stone in Herefordshire and possibly th…
 
This is ground breaking research from the Balkans where researchers are piecing together the apparently widespread use of cosmetics as far back as six and a half thousand years ago. Tiny ceramic bottles have been excavated across a wide region of the Balkans and Transdanubia, and as long ago as the 1930s it was suggested that they might be for cosm…
 
30,000 years ago, close to the banks of the river Danube, it seems that the saddest of events occurred to a family living there during the Paleolithic period. Michael and Rupert bring you some of the background to this story emerging from the latest aDNA study of remains found in the town of Krems in Austria. 🔵 PATREON: We have a friendly and enthu…
 
Welcome to another prehistory guys interview, introducing you to archaeologists and historians, all too often hidden behind the scenes, finding out what they’re up to while the world isn’t watching. This time we're talking with Dr Lee Bray, lead archaeologist for the Dartmoor National Park in Devon, south west England. Lee started out in geology be…
 
For the season finale of The Backpacker's Guide To Prehistory, host David Mountain ventures into the Pleistocene, a time of woolly mammoths, sabretooth cats and some pretty unpleasant wombattitude. From the barren wastes of the northern tundra to the treacherous woodlands of Ice Age Australia, discover the dos and don'ts (and the don't-even-think-a…
 
Gather round the campfire as host David Mountain prepares for an adventure through the Triassic, the Jurassic's older, cooler brother. If you can avoid being eaten by giant reptiles, falling into enormous dung beds and getting stuck in a two-million-year-long rainstorm, then the Triassic might just be the trip of your lifetime! Providing some much-…
 
Set your time machines for the dawn of the Phanerozoic! In this episode host David Mountain travels all the way back to the Cambrian period and dives into an unrecognisable world of bizarre creatures and treacherous environments. Helping to make sense of the oddest period in prehistory are Dr Martin Smith, a palaeontologist at Durham University (ht…
 
Up for an adventure holiday? Then join host David Mountain as he travels back to the Permian, perhaps the most infamous interval in all Earth history. From giant insects to sabretooth reptiles to a truly massive mass extinction, the Permian promises to be a trip like no other. Providing some much-needed travel tips are Dr Neil Brocklehurst, a palae…
 
For this episode of The Backpacker's Guide To Prehistory, host David Mountain travels all the way back to the Devonian period, 419-359 million years ago. In this weird world of giant fungi and armour-plated fish, what creatures should you look out for? Where should you pitch your tent? And should you really take a dip in Devonian waters? Providing …
 
Welcome to The Backpacker's Guide To Prehistory! For this first episode, host David Mountain explores the dos and don'ts of travelling back to the Cretaceous period, 145-66 million years ago. What clothes should you pack? What dinosaurs should you look out for? And what are the chances you'll be eaten alive on your holiday? Providing the answers ar…
 
Coming soon: a podcast providing top travel tips for time travellers, whether you're scuba diving with sea scorpions or camping next to Columbian mammoths. Each episode host David Mountain will be asking experts in palaeobiology about the most important, interesting and exciting aspects of our planet's prehistory. Stay tuned for more! This trailer …
 
12th feb 2021 BBc broadcast a programme hosted by Professor Alice Roberts called 'Stonehenge, the Lost Circle Revealed'. Both leading up to and afterwards, there was a flurry of headlines in the press ranging from the reasonably restrained to the outright sensational. To cut to the chase, the end result has been - to the dismay of many in the archa…
 
"Welcome to another prehistory guys interview, introducing you to people, often hidden in the background, whose work is really making a difference to our understanding of humanity in prehistory "Today we’re talking with Dr Kenny Brophy Senior lecturer of archaeology at the University of Glasgow. Kenny’s work focuses mainly on the British Neolithic,…
 
IT'S BACK! Rupert & I are delighted to present you with a recording of us producing our first audio podcast after a long break. We're back to our old format with Pushing Back the Boundaries, news, a central topic and finishing off with Stonehead of the Month and a bit of Whimsy. Scroll down for links to some source material. There is a video versio…
 
Despite any number of challenges over the past six years, including more recently the Covid lockdowns of course, Amanda has kept driving the project of giving the museum a complete overhaul and redesign, and with her team has created a breathtaking set of galleries that cover the full span of human history in the Cotswolds. One thing that makes Ama…
 
In fact, some of Tom’s recent research has even shed light on different funerary practices in the Bronze Age, revealing some fascinating discoveries about ways that people related to, or looked after the remains of their departed. (We first reported on this in a piece in the Prehistory Show #3. https://www.patreon.com/posts/prehistory-show-42771218…
 
The aim of these two chaps is to transform the economy of Caithness, no less - up in the North East corner of Scotland! And the medium by which they're going to achieve this? By building an Iron Age Broch of course!Crazy? Not so fast. There's method in their madness, but you'll have to listen to the podcast to find out why. Help support us and join…
 
However, she has a particular passion for Iron Age torcs, running a website with restorer Roland Williamson called The Big Book of Torcs. https://bigbookoftorcs.com/ There's no-one better with whom to explore the detail and peculiarities of these magnificent artefacts than Tess and 'talking torcs' is the central theme of this discussion. And then -…
 
Elizabeth Dale A.K.A. 'The Cornish Bird' can trace her heritage in Cornwall back more than 500 years. As you probably know, from a megalithic point of view, Cornwall is one of the most densely packed areas in the whole of the UK and if you visit Lizzie's blog 'The Cornish Bird' https://cornishbirdblog.com, you're sure to find her writing beautifull…
 
It was an absolute delight talking with Caroline & Tom about their insights into what it was like living in the Iron Age. This is archaeology from the other end of the barrel; actually living and working with the available foods, materials, pigments and technology gives an insight into prehistoric life that simply looking at archaeological remains …
 
We met Seren in 2019 at the Prehistoric Society’s 'Landscapes of the Dead' conference at the Society of Antiquaries in London where she gave a fantastic talk. In fact, the first thing Rupert said to Michael after her presentation was that he really wished she had been one of his lecturers! It really is no surprise that Seren was the youngest person…
 
We do try to bring you wide ranging areas of study and this month we’re delighted to be joined by Professor Duncan Garrow of Reading University We met Duncan at the Landscapes of the Dead conference back in November 2019 and knew we had to get him on the show. Apart from being a great speaker, he is another frontline archaeologist who makes you rec…
 
True to form, The Prehistory Guys chase down another media headline to find the hidden treasure! In this case, news of a new date for old London conceals the real story: the first use of a new and exciting archaeological dating technique for pottery. Help support us and join our Patreon community See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out inform…
 
We were saddened to learn of the passing of the great archaeologist. For megalithic enthusiasts, his influence has been profound and that holds true for us and the podcasts and films we make. We couldn't let the moment pass without saying a few words. Help support us and join our Patreon community See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out infor…
 
The Prehistory Guys talk to environmental archaeologist and conchologist (snail expert) Dr Mike Allen, lecturer at Oxford University and research fellow at Bournemouth University. Help support us and join our Patreon community See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.Autor: Michael Bott and Rupert Soskin
 
In December 2019 reports began to appear in the media about the discovery of an anomaly in the Callanish landscape on Lewis that pointed to a 5,000 year old lightning strike being the inspiration for the famous monument. The discovery was made by the Calanais Virtual Reconstruction Project, a joint venture led by the University of St Andrews with s…
 
A couple of podcasts back, we interviewed Professor Bruce Bradley - he of the Solutrean Hypothesis in Paleolithic America. Truth be told, the impetus to contact Bruce Bradley came about because we'd noticed that an outfit called 'Seven Ages Research Associates' in the States had just published an interview with him. It was a bit "if they can - why …
 
In 1980, archaeologist Julian Richards was invited to direct the 'Stonehenge Environs Project' which had been conceived to better understand the landscape surrounding the monument and to work out ways in which it could be better managed and preserved for the future. Part of the work involved the partial excavation of a small henge on Coneybury Hill…
 
Please support The Prehistory Guys on Patreon.https://www.patreon.com/theprehistoryguys Though we say this ourselves, this interview with Professor Timothy Darvill OBE, should be required listening for all serious students of archaeology and fascinated amateurs alike. From his own early childhood beginnings in the discipline, to his thoughts on the…
 
We have to confess we are not as knowledgable about American prehistory as we would like to be. But how could we have done better to begin educating ourselves than to talk to celebrated American archaeologist, Professor Bruce Bradley? Until recently Emeritus Professor of Prehistory and Director of the Experimental Archaeology Masters Programme at t…
 
The Prehistory Guys are very proud to share with you this fantastic interview with Dr. Alison Sheridan, recently retired Principal Archaeological Research Curator at the National Museums of Scotland. As you'll find out in the first minutes of this podcast, Alison's C.V. is simply spectacular. If there's such a thing as an A-List archaeologist, she …
 
Ancient craft and brewing specialist Merryn Dineley, together with her brewing expert husband Graham join us to discus how the general unawareness of the way beer is brewed leads to the evidence for it in prehistory being overlooked. Once the process is understood, then the existence of large vessels, like the Grooved Ware pot from Durrington Walls…
 
Earlier in December, news articles began to show up reporting the discovery of very old cave art on the island of Sulawesi in Indonesia. What is significant about the find is that it pushes back the date of the earliest figurative painting a long way, such that this REPRESENTATIVE cave art in Indonesia is of a similar age to the first know ABSTRACT…
 
We're kicking off our regular interview features with our good friend and colleague Dr. Rick Pettigrew of the Archaeological Legacy Institute in Eugene, Oregon. The photo above is of Rick standing in front of West Kennet long barrow back in September this year when we were on the 'Backbone of Neolithic Britain' tour. The tour was instigated by Rick…
 
Does our ancient landscape lie to us? Well, there is a sense in which we are deceived ... or is it we who deceive ourselves? Michael and Rupert discuss how our natural instinct for creating meaning out of what we see might lead us a little astray. All this and the regular magazine slots in the latest episode of what is now THE PREHISTORY GUYS podca…
 
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