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Located on the channel from Mona Lake to Lake Michigan, the Lake Harbor Hotel was in a perfect spot to enjoy the cool summer breezes and a dip in the water. This large hotel would become the premier resort of West Michigan and would offer all the amenities of a top resort today. The hotel would be a beacon of tourism for Muskegon until it burned do…
 
Today we are joined by Dr. Janet Brashler former anthropology professor at GVSU, as she discusses the history and importance of the Spring Creek Site located in Muskegon County. This archaeological site is on the national register of historic places and dates to around 100 B.C. to 1100 AD. To see some of the sites collection at the University of Mi…
 
Margaret Drake Elliot was a noted author, naturalist, and librarian among many other roles. Her deep knowledge of the natural world led her to become the leading expert in the field and earned her the nickname "bird lady" due to her particular knowledge of birds. Join us as we discuss the many contributions of Margaret Drake Elliot during her incre…
 
Major General Philip Kearny most likely never visited Muskegon and probably had never even heard of it; however, his fame as a military leader would inspire those of Muskegon to honor him in several ways including creating a memorial park in his honor. On our episode today we go into the life of Philip Kearny and the how and why a statue and a park…
 
On our podcast today we examine the history of the Arctic Grayling in Michigan. Once an important food source for Native American's and settlers alike, grayling were eliminated in Michigan due to over fishing and habitat destruction through practices such as lumbering. In recent years, huge efforts have been made to try and reintroduce these rainbo…
 
The Beyond the Swinging Door: Servant's Podcast takes a deep dive into the personal lives of some of the servants that were responsible for running the Hackely and Hume houses day to day operations. This episode is in conjunction with the Dressing the Abbey exhibit at the Museum Museum of Art which looks at the outfits of the resident of the fictio…
 
With the entire west side of Muskegon County bordering Lake Michigan, ships have often played a vital role in the development of the area through commerce or recreation. To help guide these ships safely over the years lighthouse have been used to identify various ports of call. On our podcast today we look back at the history of these lighthouses. …
 
Listen in as Wendy interviews Geologist Greg Waite from Michigan Tech about earthquakes in general and how they can occur in the Midwest. Professor Waite will also answer questions about earthquakes from children at Muskegon Christian Elementary. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/patrick-horn/support…
 
In 1937, Muskegon held a centennial festival to celebrate the 100 year anniversary of the first sawmill being built on Muskegon Lake, and Michigan becoming a state. This festival had many oddities and events, but it also included the collection of Muskegon artifacts. It was this collection that became the basis for a county history museum. 85 years…
 
Originally built as a Civilian Conservation Corps project during the Great Depression, the Blockhouse with its great view of Lake Michigan, quickly became a local icon and popular destination. It also became a target for vandals and would survive much before being burned down in 1962. The destruction of this structure proved the communities love of…
 
Today we are joined by Mallory Metzger, Marketing and Program Coordinator for Hackley Public Library as we talk about the creation, history, and legacy of this Muskegon cultural institution. We also discuss the library's role in Muskegon's community today and the resources they provide. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/patrick-horn/suppo…
 
On part two of our history of the Maccabees, we examine a Muskegon resident Mother Adelphia Ward and her mission to create a women's branch of the Maccabees. Find out what vital role this organization played and what it took for a female lead organization to get the credibility and respect it deserved. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/pa…
 
The Knights of the Maccabees were a fraternal order that at one time had members throughout North America. Over the years the organization disbanded except for a strong presence that lasted in Michigan. In this part 1 of 2 we examine the history of this organization, in part 2 to follow in two weeks, we will cover the strong ties between the Maccab…
 
Charles Hackley, in his lifetime, gave much back to Muskegon in his desire to make it a better place. Many of these donations still serve Muskegon County residents today. Our topic today however, has recently had it's story come to a close in its physical form, but will remain in the minds and hearts of many of our listeners. Today we look at the c…
 
George Quimby was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan and spent much of his early life in Western Michigan. As a young man he was a sailor in the Great Lakes but also was a part of many early archaeological excavations in Muskegon County. He would become the director of the Lakeshore Museum Center in 1942 before becoming the Curator of North American Ar…
 
In the winter of 1978, Muskegon County and most of Michigan saw over 2 feet of snow fall in period of several hours. On our episode today we look at the circumstances that led to this super storm, how residents dealt with it, and the consequences of that blizzard. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/patrick-horn/support…
 
Today's episode dives into the tumultuous life of one of Charles Hackley's grandsons, Leigh "Hack" Smith. This episodes looks both at the highs and lows in his life and how he helped carry on the Hackley legacy in Muskegon and abroad. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/patrick-horn/support
 
In part 1 of our story on White Lake we examine the history of several industries in the White Lake area and how they impacted the lake and local environment. In part 2 we will focus on the clean up effort the revitalized White Lake and restored it to some of its former glory. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/patrick-horn/support…
 
Reverend Archibald Hadden served First Congregational Church in Muskegon for 28 years. However this was just a part of his life. Hadden would also be a city commissioner, mayor, president of Hackley Hospital, serve on the committee for the Hackley Park statues, and argue for the creation of playgrounds in Muskegon. The Reverend was well respected i…
 
Our podcast episode today will be a little different. Instead of focusing on a specific topic, place, or person, we are going to do a broad episode to cover the history of lumbering in the area. Lumbering was vital to the development of the area and Michigan as a whole, and on today's episode we are going to explain exactly how lumbering was done. …
 
In part two of a history of Hoffmaster Park, Wendy interviews long time naturalist Elizabeth Tillman about her time at Hoffmaster and the changes she has seen to the park over the years. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/patrick-horn/support
 
In this episode staff member Wendy interviews her father Charles DeWitt and her Uncle Feller about their experiences growing up near Norton Township Park which would later become Hoffmaster State Park. The duo shares stories of their time in the park and the changes they have seen to it over the years. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/pa…
 
On today's special episode in partnership with the Michigan Irish Music Festival and their Hackley Hooley event on September 18th, we take a look at the history of the most famous Irishmen to call Muskegon home, Thomas Hume. Business partner to Charles Hackley, Thomas Hume would in his life acquire millions, much of which was given back to the comm…
 
On today's special episode in partnership with the Michigan Irish Music Festival and their Hackley Hooley event on September 18th, we take a look at the history of Irish settlers in Muskegon County and some of their contributions to our past. Please make sure to also listen to our episode on Irishmen Thomas Hume and his life story. --- Support this…
 
Today's podcast is off to the races as we examine the history of The Muskegon Race Course and one of its most famous competitors who went on to win great fame Red Rhone. Image Credit: M-Live Audio Credits: 1989 Balmoral Park RED RHONE Randy Edmunds Author: Harnessdom, uploaded August 6th, 2016 URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TuGYbzeH2Zo 1989 S…
 
The Pomona or Fruitport Pavilion was once one of the most popular attractions in Muskegon County. This dance hall saw many famous musicians play on the shores of Spring Lake including Louis Armstrong and Lawrence Welk among others. Tragically the pavilion would burn down in 1963 and would never be rebuilt ending an era in Fruitport. --- Support thi…
 
George McCoy may have been one of Muskegon Counties most interesting criminals and was always in trouble with the law. From shooting Charles Hackley's brother Porter, to shooting at the sheriff, and all his various escapes from prison, McCoy's story fills a book of broken laws and prison sentences. In our episode today we try to piece together the …
 
Lawrence Hogan was a Muskegon County resident who may have set the record for the amount of time spent in court. From lawsuits over farm animals, to cases of assault, to the argument with a neighbor that got him bitten and in the hospital with tetanus. Lawrence Hogan certainly knew his way around the court room. Join us to listen about his legal ex…
 
Electricity is so vital to our lives today that it is hard for us to imagine a world without it. As vital as it is today when electricity was first introduced it take awhile before it gained in popularity and wide spread use. On our episode today we trace the ups and down of early electricity in Muskegon. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm…
 
On September 6, 1901 President William McKinley was shot while visiting the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, New York. He would later die from these wounds and the nation began the process of grieving. Charles Hackley, a supporter of McKinley would after his death donate funds for the creation of a statue of the martyred president. Today's episo…
 
Starting as Central Paper, the paper mill in Muskegon had many names and a long history to match it. Central Paper ended up being located in Muskegon partially because of a glance at a map, from this fortuitous glance it grew to be a leading industry in town and saw many ups and downs in business. In the past years this large complex has been torn …
 
While the name evergreen fits today, Evergreen Cemetery was not always a beautiful and peaceful resting place. In our episode today we look at the history behind the creation of this cemetery and how it turned into the final resting place for many of Muskegon's most famous residents. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/patrick-horn/support…
 
On today's podcast we moooove in a different direction as we examine the stories of several farmers and their cows that ended up becoming embroiled in legal disputes or news headlines. Find out the stories behind who the rightful owner of the doomed cow was, who/what poisoned Mr Potters cows, and was there a cow disease on the loose in eastern Musk…
 
At 4:00am on October 29, 1919 the worst naval disaster in Muskegon's history occurred when the steamer Muskegon crashed into the pier of the Muskegon Channel and sank taking many lives with it. On today's podcast we examine what led to that moment and what came after for those involved. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/patrick-horn/suppo…
 
James McGordon like many lumber barons came to Muskegon with dreams of riches. Working his way up from the bottom he managed to become a business partner to Charles Hackley and obtained his riches. However his life took many twists and turns leading to many scandalous incidents before his death in 1880. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/p…
 
On today's episode we are joined by Steven Winston a business owner and researcher who through examining his own culture discovered the roots of two black organizations (Muskegon County Black Organizations-MCBO and Michigan Association of Black Organizations-MABO) created during the civil rights movement to help unify blacks in the county and state…
 
Caution this episode looks at the darker side of Muskegon's history and contains themes not suitable for younger audiences. On the podcast today we dive into the darker side of Muskegon's history and present the history of the Canterbury House, a place where everything goes and where you could find your hearts desires. This house catered to lumberj…
 
Much like many of us today, people 100 years ago like to have pine trees in their home for the holiday season. However those that lived in large cities like Chicago had trouble finding trees. Enter lumber schooners who on their last trip of the year would often load their deck and hold with evergreens to bring to the market and sell. Today we look …
 
Operating for only a short time, the Lake Harbor railroad ran along the lake from today's Pere Marquette Beach to the Mona Lake Channel. This railroad was built to serve those headed to the resorts in the Lake Harbor area. On today's episode we discuss its construction and history with local historian Garry Olson. --- Support this podcast: https://…
 
In 1913 a curious site was seen on the beach in Muskegon. A new invention never before seen in the area landed in the water nearby and a curious figured emerge, a bird-man. This was the first time a plane had been seen in Muskegon much less one that could land on water. Today's podcast tells the story of the race around the Great Lakes that brought…
 
In the 1880s digging for brine lead to a curious discovery, the presence of oil in many parts of Muskegon County. It will not until the end of the 1920s that this oil and its potential impact on Muskegon County was realized, as the first oil wells were dug. Learn about the fascinating history of the discovery and harvesting of oil, and its impact o…
 
The fur trade in Michigan attracted some of the earliest Europeans to the area and led to the earliest interaction between these Europeans and Native Americans. Muskegon County with its many lakes and rivers was a destination for the animals valued by the fur traders and Native Americans alike. On today's episode we dive into the history of those f…
 
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