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Native Opinion is a unique Indigenous culture education Radio show & podcast from an American Indian perspective on current affairs. The Hosts of this show are Michael Kickingbear, an enrolled member of the Mashantucket Pequot tribal nation of Connecticut and David GreyOwl, of the Echoda Eastern Band of Cherokee nation of Alabama. Together they present Indigenous views on American history, politics, the environment, and culture. This show is open to all people, and its main focus is to provi ...
 
The Native American Flute Music podcast is hosted by Bill Webb. Bill Webb is a composer, performer and singer of original music featuring Native American flute and world instruments. The Native American Flute Podcast includes music from dozens of his published albums from the first release, 'Native American Flute' in 2003 to 'Medicine' released in 2017. New albums will be played on the weekly podcasts as they are released along with the many previous albums. Native American Flute guest artis ...
 
History podcasts of Mexico, Latina, Latino, Hispanic, Chicana, Chicano, Mexicana, Mexicano, genealogy, mexico, mexican, mexicana, mexicano, mejico, mejicana, mejicano, hispano, hispanic, hispana, latino, latina, latin, america, espanol, espanola, spanish, indigenous, indian, indio, india, native, native american, chicano, chicana, mesoamerican, mesoamerica, raza, podcast, podcasting, nuestra, familia, or unida are welcome here. If it has to do with the history of America, California, Oregon, ...
 
This podcast was developed as part of an elementary-level Clark County School District Teaching American History Grant. The three-year grant will fund six modules per year with each module focusing on a different era of American history and a different pedagogical theme. This podcast focuses on Native Americans of the Colonial Era and Technology Integration in Elementary Schools. Participants in the grant are third, fourth, and fifth grade teachers in Clark County (the greater Las Vegas area ...
 
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show series
 
Brotherhood to Nationhood: George Manuel and the Making of the Modern Indian Movement (Between the Lines Books, 2020) details the life of George Manuel, a seminal figure in the emergence and development of the modern Indigenous rights movement in Canada. A three-time Nobel Peace Prize nominee, he laid the groundwork for what would become the Assemb…
 
It is still all about the numbers. The push to stop legal abortion is all about preserving and securing a hold on the ideology of white supremacy. If one was to drill down and see what the push has been in the past it is all about preserving white majorities.Autor: Native Opinion Incorporated
 
In Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres (Peter Lang, 2020), Irune del Rio Gabiola examines the power of affect in structuring decolonizing modes of resistance performed by social movements such as COPINH (Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras). Despite a harsh leg…
 
The important new book by Alicia Puglionesi, In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession and the Landscapes of American Empire (Scribner, 2022), is a fat sampler of episodes that show how origin stories get made, what happens when white-supremacist origin stories are mistaken for empirical fact, and how the political impacts persist. The book is decidedly an…
 
No matter what people call them today the northwestern Great Plains have been and continue to be Blackfoot country, argues Colgate University assistant professor Ryan Hall in Beneath the Backbone of the World: Blackfoot People and the North American Borderlands, 1720-1877 (University of North Carolina Press, 2020). By maintaining their boundaries a…
 
There has always been a pervasive greed and hatred toward Natives and other peoples of color in this country. The desire to not be inclusive is a part of the everyday behaviors of State and local governments. When it comes to the overall inequality people of color face in this country, the phrase; ”Let them eat grass.” comes to mind.…
 
Prophets and Ghosts: The Story of Salvage Anthropology (Harvard UP, 2021) is a searching account of nineteenth-century salvage anthropology, an effort to preserve the culture of “vanishing” Indigenous peoples through dispossession of the very communities it was meant to protect. In the late nineteenth century, anthropologists, linguists, archaeolog…
 
In The Apache Diaspora: Four Centuries of Displacement and Survival (U Pennsylvania Press, 2021), Paul Conrad brings to life the stories of displaced Apaches and the kin from whom they were separated. Conrad uses the lens of “diaspora” to analyze four centuries of Ndé/Apache history, from their initial interactions with Europeans in the sixteenth c…
 
In May 1776 more than two hundred Indian warriors descended the St. Lawrence River to attack Continental forces at the Cedars, west of Montreal. In just three days’ fighting, the Native Americans and their British and Canadian allies forced the American fort to surrender and ambushed a fatally delayed relief column. In Down the Warpath to the Cedar…
 
The 1980s and '90s saw Latin American governments recognizing the property rights of Indigenous and Afro-descendent communities as part of a broader territorial policy shift. But the resulting reforms were not applied consistently, more often extending neoliberal governance than recognizing Indigenous Peoples' rights. In Negotiating Autonomy: Mapuc…
 
Often overlooked, there is mixed blood at the heart of America. And at the heart of Native life for centuries there were complex households using intermarriage to link disparate communities and create protective circles of kin. Beginning in the seventeenth century, Native peoples—Ojibwes, Otoes, Cheyennes, Chinooks, and others—formed new families w…
 
Things were fine with the environment in this country, and water “management” was not a problem until the arrival of the colonizers. In this episode, we take a look at a long-standing and recently overturned federal rule which was used to limit tribal sovereignty.Autor: Native Opinion Incorporated
 
In Colonial Kinship: Guaraní, Spaniards, and Africans in Paraguay (U New Mexico Press, 2020), historian Shawn Michael Austin traces the history of conquest and colonization in Paraguay during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Emphasizing the social and cultural agency of Guaraní--one of the primary indigenous peoples of Paraguay--not only in…
 
Tradition comes in many forms. For our indigenous communities, one way they are preserved are through our food systems. In this episode of our show, we present two examples of how tribes are using traditional food systems for the continuance of traditional ways. In our "Racism in America" segment, we focus on a hotel in South Dakota who refuses to …
 
Hawai'i Is My Haven: Race and Indigeneity in the Black Pacific (Duke UP, 2021) maps the context and contours of Black life in the Hawaiian Islands. This ethnography emerges from a decade of fieldwork with both Hawaiʻi-raised Black locals and Black transplants who moved to the Islands from North America, Africa, and the Caribbean. Nitasha Tamar Shar…
 
It really feels like the desire of some folks to embarrass themselves and the country as a whole has finally reached the pinnacle of Lowes. In this episode, we run another story about the Port Neeches Grove High school in Texas, and their continued disgusting behavior of appropriating Native American culture through their athletics sports program, …
 
In The Creole Archipelago: Race and Borders in the Colonial Caribbean (U Pennsylvania Press, 2021), Tessa Murphy traces how generations of Indigenous Kalinagos, free and enslaved Africans, and settlers from a variety of European nations used maritime routes to forge social, economic, and informal political connections that spanned the eastern Carib…
 
Herring are vital to the productivity and health of marine systems, and socio-ecologically Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) is one of the most important fish species in the Northern Hemisphere. Human dependence on herring has evolved for millennia through interactions with key spawning areas, but humans have also significantly impacted the species…
 
Josefa Velasquez lived a long and full life. When Josefa wasn't co-running a tamale factory and cantina just outside of Wastonville, she was hosting friends and family at her saloon, where "drinking, dancing, and eating tomales" abounded. Josefa's friend, Maria Ascenciόn Solόrsano, was surprised she lived so long: "this woman lived like a rich woma…
 
Larissa Fasthorse's new collection of plays includes the wildly successful plays The Thanksgiving Play/What Would Crazy Horse Do? (Theatre Communications Group, 2021). In both plays, Fasthorse explores issues facing contemporary Native Americans, but also white America's complicated self-identity in an era of multiculturalism. In The Thanksgiving P…
 
In relation to Native cultures non-Natives have no interest in the preservation of our cultures. There are many non-Natives who will more times than not do everything possible to either destroy our cultures or stand in the way of our pursuits of our cultures. At this stage of the game, it is no longer a guess as to why this happens. The actions spe…
 
John and new Brandeis host Jerome Tharaud (author of Apocalyptic Geographies) learn exactly how the growth of America's public universities relied on shameful seizures of Native American land. Working with Tristan Athone --editor of Grist and a member of the Kiowa Tribe--historian Robert Lee wrote a stunning series of pieces that reveal how many pu…
 
From historian and critically acclaimed author of The Three-Cornered War comes the propulsive and vividly told story of how Yellowstone became the world’s first national park amid the nationwide turmoil and racial violence of the Reconstruction era. Each year nearly four million people visit Yellowstone National Park—one of the most popular of all …
 
Dennis Kelley is an associate professor of Religious Studies at the University of Missouri, Columbia. He received his Master’s and Doctorate from the University of California, Santa Barbara, with emphases in American Indian Religious Traditions, Religion in American Culture, and Myth and Ritual Theory. His most recent book is Tradition, Performance…
 
In This Episode: 1). Academics, artists, and allies have signed a petition to stop the infamous Theodore Roosevelt statue from being relocated from a storage facility to the ancestral homeland of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara (MHA) people in North Dakota. 2). Nooksack Tribal leaders say UN’s call for the U.S. to stop evictions of dis-enrolled ci…
 
Stephanie Khattak speaks with Dr. Linda Legarde Grover, an award-winning author whose latest book interweaves family and Ojibwe history with stories from Misaabekong (the place of the giants) on Lake Superior in Duluth, Minnesota: Gichigami Hearts: Stories and Histories from Misaabekong (U Minnesota Press, 2021) Dr. Grover is an Anishinaabe novelis…
 
Beginning with pre-Revolutionary America and moving into the movement for Black lives and contemporary Indigenous activism, Kyle T. Mays, an Afro-Indigenous historian, argues that the foundations of the US are rooted in anti-blackness and settler colonialism, and that these parallel oppressions continue into the present. In An Afro-Indigenous Histo…
 
Realization is a real eye-opener and a motivator. When we as Native people realize outside forces will usually lie with their false promises of help and assistance, Native people will take action to move ahead and work around the obstacles. DISCLAIMER: This week's episode of Native Opinion will not be this episode will containing explicit language.…
 
The Church of the Dead: The Epidemic of 1576 and the Birth of Christianity in the Americas (NYU Press, 2021) tells the story of the founding of American Christianity against the backdrop of devastating disease, and of the Indigenous survivors who kept the nascent faith alive Many scholars have come to think of the European Christian mission to the …
 
The Indigenous Paleolithic of the Western Hemisphere (U Nebraska Press, 2021) is a reclaimed history of the deep past of Indigenous people in North and South America during the Paleolithic. Paulette F. C. Steeves mines evidence from archaeology sites and Paleolithic environments, landscapes, and mammalian and human migrations to make the case that …
 
In this episode of Native Opinion: NEWS: 1). Joe Manchin is facing calls from a powerful group close to his heart to reconsider his opposition to the Build Back Better Act: Coal miners. https://www.cnn.com/2021/12/21/business/coal-miners-joe-manchin/index.html 2). A new round of grant funding by the Department of Housing and Urban Development — $83…
 
When the Choctaw Nation was forcibly resettled in Indian Territory in present-day Oklahoma in the 1830s, it was joined by enslaved Black people—the tribe had owned enslaved Blacks since the 1720s. By the eve of the Civil War, 14 percent of the Choctaw Nation consisted of enslaved Blacks. Avid supporters of the Confederate States of America, the Nat…
 
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