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Delivered before breakfast, The Economist Morning Briefing tells you what’s on the global agenda in the coming day, what to look out for in business, finance and politics and, most importantly, what to make of it. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions, including the full Economist Morning Briefing: https://www.economist.com/briefingoffer. Digital subscribers to The Economist should log in at https://www.economist.com/espresso for access to the ...
 
The Economist unlocks American politics, tackling a new theme each week and digging into the data, ideas, and history shaping the country at this dramatic moment. John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. Correspondents from across the US and the rest of the world plus expert guests - politicians, pollsters, professors - join the in-depth reporting and discussion every Friday.
 
The Economist unlocks the science, data and politics behind the most ambitious inoculation programme the world has ever seen. Alok Jha, The Economist’s science correspondent, hosts with Natasha Loder, our health-policy editor. Each week our reporters and data journalists join them in conversation, along with scientists around the world. They inject the perfect dose of insight and analysis into the global effort to escape the pandemic.
 
The EIU Digital Economy podcast is a monthly series examining the technologies, ideas and people driving the digitisation of the global economy. Sponsored by DXC, the podcast aims to help business leaders understand the way in which digital technology affects their companies, their teams, and their careers.
 
We deliver vital business intelligence to executives the world over. With access to over 650 expert analysts and editors across 200 countries worldwide, underpinned by an unrivalled in-house survey panel that bolsters the qualitative and quantitative analysis, we uncover novel and forward-looking perspectives.
 
Rising global temperatures have already increased the frequency of floods, wildfires, droughts, and heatwaves around the world. If humanity does not change course rapidly, the effects of climate change will become more extreme. What can be done to avoid this outcome? Vijay Vaitheeswaran, the Economist’s global energy and climate innovation editor, will be joined weekly by expert guests to explore how everything—from finance to agriculture, transport to international policy—will have to chang ...
 
Special Relationship is a podcast collaboration that examines the US presidential election from the characteristic perspectives of two leading news organizations. Hosted by The Economist’s John Prideaux and Mic’s Celeste Katz, Special Relationship grapples with the major themes and issues in a campaign that has been anything but predictable. Each episode is a conversation, fusing deep dives into specific themes with broader perspectives provided by global and historical comparisons from both ...
 
For over 60 years CEDA has debated and discussed critical issues through our research and events platform – now we bring the conversation right to you with our Podcasts. Hear directly from some of the best and brightest policy minds in Australia and around the world, alongside our CEO Melinda Cilento and Chief Economist Jarrod Ball, as we explore the issues and pursue solutions that deliver better economic and social outcomes for the greater good.
 
Since the late 19th century, politics and economics have been split from each other, pretended and positioned as separate and unassuming forces. This could not be further from the truth. Before the dawn of Adam Smith, the grandfather of modern day economics, there was but one holistic concept, the Political Economy. Come join Max and Jorrel, modern day Political Economists, as they do their best to converse and discuss political theory, history, economics, and more in the lenses of contempor ...
 
Do you consider economics to be boring and overly complex? This podcast will change your mind. Tune in to grasp complex economic theory, problems and events in a digestible way so you can keep informed and empower yourself with the tools to engage in intellectual debate. If you're looking to boost your general knowledge of world-wide economic events and understand how changes in markets and government policies affect your well-being, this is the place to start. Follow and contact me on Insta ...
 
The Digital Economist Speaker Series drives radical collaboration between global action leaders on the most urgent topics and challenges we face today: climate, health, society, economics. With the global population facing multiple man-made crises that threaten our existence and the wellbeing of the planet, using science and technology to serve human needs is no longer a choice – it's a necessity.
 
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The departure of one of America’s Supreme Court justices is an opportunity for President Joe Biden to choose a replacement, but the clock is ticking. We ask who might be in the running. West Africa’s latest coup, in Burkina Faso, bodes ill for an already stumbling campaign against jihadism in the region. And why countries change their capitals. For…
 
What happens if Vladimir Putin invades Ukraine again, the West hits Russia with sanctions, and Mr Putin retaliates by shutting down supply of Russian gas? The Economist’s global energy & climate innovation editor Vijay Vaitheeswaran explores how this would rock energy markets from American shale oil to Chinese imports of LNG. What are the lessons f…
 
As the country celebrates its secular constitution, we examine the rising bigotry of Hindu nationalists—at best tolerated and at worst encouraged by the ruling party. China’s propagandists are onto something: after years of dull jingoism, the entertainment they put out now is glossy, big-budget and ever more watchable. And why South-East Asia’s obs…
 
Genomic sequencing has risen to prominence during the pandemic. But the technology has vast potential to transform many aspects of human health. Host Alok Jha investigates the rise of the genome and personalised medicine. For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our…
 
The rapid development and roll-out of coronavirus vaccines has been a reminder of the power of science and technology to change the world. Host Tom Standage considers some of the technologies to watch in 2022, from 3D-printed housing and heat pumps to flying electric taxis and meetings in the metaverse. Please subscribe to The Economist for full ac…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the parable of Boris Johnson, and what it says about the country he governs. Also, America’s tech giants’ ambitious investments (10:05) and do vaccine mandates actually work? (19:10) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digit…
 
Joe Biden voters are more likely to have a negative view of the United States than those who voted for Donald Trump, according to new research from The Economist. A year since his inauguration, is this miserablism largely a result of President Biden’s recent woes, or is there something inherently gloomy in the left’s mindset? The Economist’s Daniel…
 
The veteran reporter was a teenager when he first walked into a newsroom. He tells Anne McElvoy how that moment led him to become one half of the most famous bylines in journalism. They discuss the decline in trust in the media and echoes of Watergate in American politics today. And the author of “Chasing History” reflects on a painful moment from …
 
#108 God’s Frameworks God made a complex world. Humans categorize it using frameworks. Frameworks. That’s what we teach in college level education. God made a complex world. Humans try to categorize it so we can understand it better. In the second session of my Econ class, I give framework assignments to groups of students. They……
 
Have you just recently found this podcast? This is a great episode to start with. Peter and Michelle talk about what they learned in 2021 and give a recap of the dozen or so amazing guests that joined the show. They also share the things they are looking forward to next year. If you hear about an episode you like, please go back and have a listen. …
 
What happens if Vladimir Putin invades Ukraine again, the West hits Russia with sanctions, and Mr Putin retaliates by shutting down supply of Russian gas? The Economist’s global energy & climate innovation editor Vijay Vaitheeswaran explores how this would rock energy markets from American shale oil to Chinese imports of LNG. What are the lessons f…
 
As the country celebrates its secular constitution, we examine the rising bigotry of Hindu nationalists—at best tolerated and at worst encouraged by the ruling party. China’s propagandists are onto something: after years of dull jingoism, the entertainment they put out now is glossy, big-budget and ever more watchable. And why South-East Asia’s obs…
 
Genomic sequencing has risen to prominence during the pandemic. But the technology has vast potential to transform many aspects of human health. Host Alok Jha investigates the rise of the genome and personalised medicine. For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our…
 
More Russian troops piling in. Embassy staff pulling out. American forces on alert and sober diplomacy still on the docket. We examine Vladimir Putin's ways, means and motivations. The Omicron variant is making its mark in Mexico, a place that our correspondent says never really shut down. And considering the merits and the risks of work-related dr…
 
More Russian troops piling in. Embassy staff pulling out. American forces on alert and sober diplomacy still on the docket. We examine Vladimir Putin's ways, means and motivations. The Omicron variant is making its mark in Mexico, a place that our correspondent says never really shut down. And considering the merits and the risks of work-related dr…
 
The rapid development and roll-out of coronavirus vaccines has been a reminder of the power of science and technology to change the world. Host Tom Standage considers some of the technologies to watch in 2022, from 3D-printed housing and heat pumps to flying electric taxis and meetings in the metaverse. Please subscribe to The Economist for full ac…
 
This week’s secretive votes will determine the next president and the current prime minister looks to be a favourite. But that move would be bad for Italy. Many African countries that are rife with resources remain persistently underdeveloped; we dig into the reasons. And we meet the chefs bringing unsung Native American cuisine to the table. For f…
 
This week’s secretive votes will determine the next president and the current prime minister looks to be a favourite. But that move would be bad for Italy. Many African countries that are rife with resources remain persistently underdeveloped; we dig into the reasons. And we meet the chefs bringing unsung Native American cuisine to the table. For f…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the parable of Boris Johnson, and what it says about the country he governs. Also, America’s tech giants’ ambitious investments (10:05) and do vaccine mandates actually work? (19:10) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digit…
 
Joe Biden voters are more likely to have a negative view of the United States than those who voted for Donald Trump, according to new research from The Economist. A year since his inauguration, is this miserablism largely a result of President Biden’s recent woes, or is there something inherently gloomy in the left’s mindset? The Economist’s Daniel…
 
The Omicron variant is destined to test the limits of a policy that has already proved costly: consumption, growth and confidence are all flagging. The effects of Russia’s gulag did not stop when the labour camps closed: there appear to be long-term benefits for nearby areas. And why cycling in the Arab world is on the rise. For full access to prin…
 
The Omicron variant is destined to test the limits of a policy that has already proved costly: consumption, growth and confidence are all flagging. The effects of Russia’s gulag did not stop when the labour camps closed: there appear to be long-term benefits for nearby areas. And why cycling in the Arab world is on the rise. For full access to prin…
 
The veteran reporter was a teenager when he first walked into a newsroom. He tells Anne McElvoy how that moment led him to become one half of the most famous bylines in journalism. They discuss the decline in trust in the media and echoes of Watergate in American politics today. And the author of “Chasing History” reflects on a painful moment from …
 
Shoppers across the developed world face sharply rising prices, and leaders are reaching for all manner of remedies—but that’s what central banks are for. Behind the story of Myanmar’s brutal military leadership is a slow stream of defectors; our correspondent meets the support network they rely on. And cover songs muddle the notion of who can call…
 
Shoppers across the developed world face sharply rising prices, and leaders are reaching for all manner of remedies—but that’s what central banks are for. Behind the story of Myanmar’s brutal military leadership is a slow stream of defectors; our correspondent meets the support network they rely on. And cover songs muddle the notion of who can call…
 
This week Microsoft announced its biggest ever deal, spending $69bn on games publisher Activision Blizzard to advance its ambitions in gaming and the metaverse. The world’s most powerful tech companies are racing to splash their cash on frontier technologies. We crunch the numbers on where they are investing their billions and ask whether these new…
 
This week Microsoft announced its biggest ever deal, spending $69bn on games publisher Activision Blizzard to advance its ambitions in gaming and the metaverse. The world’s most powerful tech companies are racing to splash their cash on frontier technologies. We crunch the numbers on where they are investing their billions and ask whether these new…
 
America’s biggest oil firm has long been recalcitrant on climate matters, so its new net-zero targets may seem surprising. We examine the substance of its pledges—and motivations. For an economist, tipping is an odd practice; whether you love it or hate it may be a question of control. And how unusual Novak Djokovic’s refusenik vaccine stance is am…
 
America’s biggest oil firm has long been recalcitrant on climate matters, so its new net-zero targets may seem surprising. We examine the substance of its pledges—and motivations. For an economist, tipping is an odd practice; whether you love it or hate it may be a question of control. And how unusual Novak Djokovic’s refusenik vaccine stance is am…
 
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