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From Oxford University's Rothermere American Institute, hosts Professor Adam Smith and Dr Alice Kelly talk to guests doing world-leading research that sheds light on the United States from the outside in. We ask what forces have shaped the culture and politics of the US, how its role in the world has changed and what it might be in the future. Is America now, or has it ever been, the "last best hope of earth"? Probably not, but plenty of people have thought so. We try to understand why.
 
RightsUp explores the big human rights issues of the day through interviews with experts, academics, practicing lawyers, activists and policy makers who are at the forefront of tackling the world's most difficult human rights questions. RightsUp is brought to you by the Oxford Human Rights Hub, based in the Law Faculty at the University of Oxford. Music for this podcast is by Rosemary Allmann. (This podcast is distributed under a CC by NC-SA 4.0 license.)
 
The Stubbs Society for Defence and Foreign Affairs, founded in 1884, is Oxford University's oldest society dedicated to the study and discussion of global politics and international relations. Join us in our new regular podcast series as we sit down with leading figures from international relations, diplomacy, intelligence, the armed forces and British and global politics.
 
Check in to Miami University's #1 radio show hosted by Evan Burnham and Joe Hayden and listen as the boys give you their hilarious take on life in the fantasy land of Oxford, Ohio. Updated with a new show every week! Check out the official Spotify playlist @Oxbox Radio.
 
Professor of Poetry Alice Oswald gives her lectures on poetry, language, literature, beauty and life every term. The Professor of Poetry lectures were conceived in 1708 by Berkshire landowner Henry Birkhead and began after he bequeathed some money so it could be a valuable supplement to the curriculum. He believed ‘the reading of the ancient poets gave keenness and polish to the minds of young men as well as to the advancement of more serious literature both sacred and human’. The first poet ...
 
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show series
 
In this podcast David Ledesma discusses a recent OIES Energy Insight on MENA oil exporting countries’ diversification strategy under deep uncertainty with the co-author Bassam Fattouh. They cover a range of issues including how Middle East oil exporters are coping with the double shocks of COVID-19 and low oil prices; what measures they are taking …
 
This is a special episode of the podcast: a panel discussion on zoom recorded on Monday 12 October, 2020, to analyse the state of the 2020 presidential race. The participants were Thomas Edsall of the New York Times, Dave Wasserman of the Cook Political Report, and Samara Klar of the University of Arizona. The chair was Adam Smith of the Rothermere…
 
We can't imagine a political campaign without music -- whether it's an election rally, a protest movement or a TV ad, music is essential. In this episode, Adam talks to Billy Coleman, author of a recent book about music and politics in the nineteenth century United States and asks him what music brings to politics and what we can learn from it abou…
 
In this podcast David Ledesma discusses a new OIES paper on renewal of Turkish long-term contracts and possible market transition away from oil-linked prices with the author Gulmira Rzayeva. They cover the lack of gas market liberalisation, which resulted in absence of a supply/demand price discovery mechanism enabling it to import gas at a price r…
 
In this episode Adam talks to Heather Cox Richardson about how the values the South fought for -- oligarchy, and racial and gender inequality -- outlived the Confederacy. Heather argues that American history can be understood as a conflict between oligarchs and masses. Adam asks her why that is. How does a "democracy" become an oligarchy? And is th…
 
In this podcast James Henderson discusses a new OIES paper on the challenge for the EU to provide a suitable regulatory framework for its new Hydrogen Strategy with Alex Barnes and Katja Yafimava. The podcast first outlines a number of EU documents where the outlook and ambitions are discussed, before focussing on the main aims of the Hydrogen Stra…
 
Constitutions are the legal bedrock of many countries, but they're also political, and are produced within a specific socio-historical context, much like any text. As much as Constitutions are there to protect citizens, they can also exclude certain groups of people. And when a Constitution doesn't work for all, how do we best address this? To what…
 
In this podcast James Henderson discusses a new OIES paper on LNG demand in 10 emerging Asian countries with the main authors Mike Fulwood and Martin Lambert. They cover the key drivers for LNG demand across the region, focussing mainly on the power sector, while also looking at the impact of declining indigenous production on the need for LNG impo…
 
Following the sharp recovery in the oil price, the Brent price has been stuck in the narrow $40/b-$45/b range since July and despite the heightened uncertainty, volatility has been exceptionally low. What factors are driving the recent price behaviour? When will oil demand recover to its pre-virus level? What explains OPEC+ high compliance? Looking…
 
China’s oil demand has almost grown by over 9 mb/d over the past two decades, accounting on average for one-third of global oil demand growth every year. Going forward, however, its oil use is expected to grow by 3–4 mb/d by 2040. Much of the new consumption is estimated to come from rising incomes and the emerging middle class, and despite the sho…
 
Covid-19 lockdowns worldwide have forced huge portions of our lives online, from education to work, with important human rights ramifications. But there's an argument to be made that the Covid-19 lockdown has been good for the environment. there have been reports of lower levels of littering and urban pollution. As humans withdrew from public space…
 
In this podcast David Ledesma talks with Agnieszka Ason about her new paper on scenarios for Asian long-term LNG contracts (LNG SPAs) before and after COVID-19. The paper argues that recent market events have delivered multiple incentives for price reviews and exposed three key needs for changes to Asian LNG SPAs: (1) to abandon oil-linked pricing,…
 
The oil demand shock, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, placed markets and benchmarks under considerable stress. Both the physical and financial market infrastructure were tested and stretched, but it then adapted, with physical differentials and freight rates allowing crude to flow from surplus areas to demand centres. In the process, however, WTI tur…
 
In this OIES podcast James Henderson talks to Martin Lambert about his latest Energy Comment on the EU’s new hydrogen strategy. They review the key elements of the strategy and provide thoughts on the main goals, highlighting the challenges that will be faced in meeting hydrogen production targets, in particular via the “green hydrogen” route. They…
 
The Stubbs society is delighted to welcome Sir Mark Lyall Grant, the former UK National Security Adviser and Ambassador and Permanent Representative to the United Nations, to our summer podcast series. Sir Mark is a former senior civil servant whose career in the Foreign Office stretched across four decades. Besides his roles in the United Nations …
 
The COVID-19 pandemic has brought questions around global healthcare financing and equitable access to treatments to the fore. But this is not the first time a spotlight has been thrown on the thorny issue of fair resource allocation in efforts to tackle global health issues. In her book, “The Uncounted: Politics of Data in Global Health” (Cambridg…
 
In this latest OIES Podcast James Henderson discusses the July Quarterly Gas Review with Mike Fulwood and Jack Sharples. They review the impact of COVID 19 on global gas markets by examining various key indicators and also by updating our global gas model and extending the range of our forecasts to 2025. After a look at various price indicators the…
 
In this week's episode, Stubbs Society Development Officer Zehra Munir sat down with Catherine Lutz, the Director of the Watson Institute’s Costs of War study. They discussed a number of pressing issues, including the ‘Costs of War’ project she is involved with, the issues with ‘feminist’ foreign intervention, the ‘language of war’ used to talk abo…
 
In this week's episode, Stubbs Society President Joe Davies sat down with Steve L. Hall, a former CIA Moscow Station Chief, to discuss Putin's Russia and 21st century espionage. They discussed a number of pressing issues, including Russian meddling in the 2016 election; the GRU putting bounties on British and American soldiers in Afghanistan; the R…
 
As China sets out its post COVID-19 recovery package, it is looking to ‘new infrastructure’ and ‘new urbanisation’ to economic growth and foster indigenous innovation. While these have long been tenets of the government’s economic rebalancing agenda, they have gained additional urgency as fears of a potential technological decoupling with the US ri…
 
This episode focuses on the how people get news about climate change and how this differs across different countries, age brackets and attitudes towards the issue. Authors of the Digital News Report, the most comprehensive study of news consumption trends worldwide, discuss the key findings from this year's report. This episode focuses on the how p…
 
In the first episode of our new podcast series, Stubbs Society President Joe Davies sat down with Principal Deputy Assistant US Secretary of State for Near Eastern Affairs Joey Hood to discuss US policy towards the Middle East region. They discussed a number of pressing issues, including US support for the Saudi-led coalition in Yemen; the assassin…
 
Over the last three decades several studies were conducted on the elusive development of regional or sub-regional natural gas networks to boost natural gas exchanges within the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. However, due to commercial and non-commercial factors, this regional or sub-regional trade remains quite limited. In this podcast…
 
In 2016, a peace agreement was negotiated between the Colombian Government and one guerrilla movement known as the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or the FARC. But the peace deal was rejected by a narrow margin in a referendum in 2016. A revised peace deal was eventually ratified by the Congress of Colombia. The peace agreement provides for…
 
In this episode we look at what people think when it comes to the news media covering politics. Authors of the Digital News Report, the most comprehensive study of news consumption trends worldwide, discuss the key findings from this year's report. In this episode we look at what people think when it comes to the news media covering politics. Shoul…
 
In this episode we look at ongoing changes to news habits and how outlets can reach and engage audiences to develop sustainable news habits. Authors of the Digital News Report, the most comprehensive study of news consumption trends worldwide, discuss the key findings from this year's report.Host: Federica Cherubini is Head of Leadership Developmen…
 
This episode focuses on the public's willingness to pay for news, what motivates them and what could persuade them. Authors of the Digital News Report, the most comprehensive study of news consumption trends worldwide, discuss the key findings from this year's report.Host: Federica Cherubini is Head of Leadership Development at the Reuters Institut…
 
Authors of the Digital News Report, the most comprehensive study of news consumption trends worldwide, discuss the key findings from this year's report. This episode focuses on our findings on the state and future of local news. Host: Federica Cherubini is Head of Leadership Development at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. She is a…
 
Authors of the Digital News Report, the most comprehensive study of news consumption trends worldwide, discuss the key findings from this year's report Host: Federica Cherubini is Head of Leadership Development at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. She is an expert in newsroom operations and organisational change, with ten years exp…
 
Does America and the world need a new New Deal? If so, what lessons can we learn from how old orthodoxies in economic policy-making were challenged in the interwar period? In this episode, Adam talks to Eric Rauchway about the year 1933, when Franklin D. Roosevelt came into office and immediately set a course that challenged some of the sacred shib…
 
The spread of Covid-19 has affected many areas of our lives with major implications for our rights and freedoms. The instigation of a UK-wide lockdown has had an especially pronounced effect on our rights, and the burden of this disruption will fall most heavily on those whose livelihoods, health, and security were already fragile. Furloughed emplo…
 
Is a country that’s had a successful revolution doomed to endlessly re-enact it? In this episode, Adam talks to Professor Margaret Weir (Brown University and Oxford) about why anti-lockdown protests take the form they do in America: armed men entering legislatures and the waving of flags with the slogan "Don't Tread on Me".…
 
The COVID-19 pandemic has affected all of us in many ways. States around the world have imposed restrictions of varying levels of stringency to control the spread of the virus. The Central Government in India introduced a nationwide 21-day lockdown on 24th of March 2020. The lockdown saw an almost complete restriction on the movement of people and …
 
Dividing power between the Federal government and the states may have seemed a good idea in theory to the founding fathers but in practice it's led to confusion and conflict. Donald Trump claims that his power is "total". State governors -- and constitutional experts -- beg to differ. In this episode, Adam talks to Grace Mallon of Oxford University…
 
What is the difference between a "crisis" and a "not-crisis"? How do crises happen and how have they shaped history? Adam talks to Jay Sexton of the University of Missouri, author of "A Nation Shaped by Crisis: A New American History" who thinks we're now in a crisis that, unlike previous crises, will leave the United States weaker.…
 
At the end of 2019, parts of Chile descended into violent unrest. Demonstrations were countrywide and challenged broad social issues, such as the increased cost of living, privatisation and growing inequality. Arising out of the protest is a proposal of constitutional change. In light of the recent unrest, politicians agreed to call a national refe…
 
In this episode, we discuss the intersection between the responses to public health crisis and human rights with Luisa Cabal, Acting Director of the Community Support, Social Justice, and Inclusion at UNAIDS. UNAIDS recently published a guidance paper of lessons learned from other pandemics, such as the HIV pandemic, about how to respect and uphold…
 
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